Improve health by massaging acupressure points

It has been proven that acupuncture is highly effective in treating various diseases and regular self-massage can also provide great health benefits to maintain wellness and alleviate minor chronic sicknesses as well as acute problems. Dr. William Young, a famous doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine in New York, shared simple techniques of self-massage during the recent Universal Consciousness Festival taken place in Dao House, Estes Park, Colorado.

As a senior licensed acupuncturist and instructor of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Dr. Young was internationally recognized as an expert on Integrative Chinese medicine that embraces functional medicine, energetic medicine, nutritional treatment, and natural healing holistically. He was invited to host a few workshops at the 3rd Annual Universal Consciousness Festival on Sept 9 – 12. As a doctor, he focuses on how individuals can maintain their own physical and mental fitness and overall wellness to prevent diseases. He highlighted his seven-key therapy as MENADID or mentality, mild exercise (like Tai Chi and Qigong), nutraceutical supplement, acupuncture (including acupuncture, acupressure massage, and herbology), bio-detox, control of inflammation, and therapeutic diet. During the Festival he talked about the importance of a healthy mentality and emphasized that without it, one can be stressed out easily. Currently, stress is the number one underlying cause for 80% of the sicknesses in the U.S. He shared proven techniques with the workshop attendees on how to manage pain, stress, anxiety, depression, and chronic diseases without invasive medication or surgeries. He offered a formula for a total bio-detox to reduce weight and taught several energy modalities to treat allergies, chronic fatigue, and a host of other conditions. He also instructed how to conduct self-massage to gain health benefits by rubbing or massaging a few major acupressure points.

Nei Guan (P6 or PC6)

Nei Guan (P6 or PC6)

Nei Guan (P6 or PC6), located on inside of your forearm with three-finger width down from the wrist line, is commonly used to relieve nausea, upset stomach, motion sickness, carpal tunnel syndrome, and headaches.

Tai Chong or Liver Three (LV3)

Tai Chong or Liver Three (LV3)

Tai Chong or Liver Three (LV3), located on the top of the foot in the valley between the big and the second toes, is commonly used to relieve stress, lower back pain, high blood pressure, menstrual cramps, limb pain, insomnia and anxiety as well as to reduce toxicity and numerous kinds of allergic reactions, especially bloodshot eyes, tired or strained eyes, frustration, irritability, and neuromuscular disorders.

He Gu (LI4)

He Gu (LI4)

He Gu (LI4), located at the highest spot of the muscle when the thumb and index fingers are brought close together, is commonly used to relieve stress, strained eyes, facial pain or itches, headaches, toothaches, and neck pain.

San Yin Jiao or Spleen 6 (SP6)

San Yin Jiao or Spleen 6 (SP6)

San Yin Jiao or Spleen 6 (SP6), located on the inside of your leg, just four-finger width above the ankle, is commonly used for urological and pelvic disorders, insomnia, and menstrual cramps as well as improving the general health of the spleen. But pregnant women should not use it.

Zu San Li or Stomach 36 (ST36)

Zu San Li or Stomach 36 (ST36)

Zu San Li or Stomach 36 (ST36), located five-finger width down from the bottom of your kneecap and two-finger away from the shin bone, is commonly used for stomach and gastrointestinal discomfort, nausea and vomiting, as well as stress and fatigue.

Quchi or Large Intestine (LI11)

Quchi or Large Intestine (LI11)

Quchi or Large Intestine (LI11), located on the lateral end of the transverse cubital crease when the elbow is bent, is one of the main points for clearing Heat and Wind from the body and great for skin diseases as well as relieve the elbow pain.

Shan Zhong or Conception Vessel 17 (CV17), located on your breastbone in between the nipples, is a great emotional balancing point to relieve stress and anxiety.

Dr. Young advised that massaging each point for 1 to 2 minutes in the morning and in the evening could improve your health greatly. And don’t forget to do them on both sides of your arms and legs. It is also advised that you should focus on the target organ as you massage the corresponding pressure point.

(Edit by Doc Luecke.)

Please visit www.VioletLiTaiChi.com for more articles on Tai Chi, Qigong, and healing arts. Share the article on your social media to raise the awareness of the art. Thanks.

 

Please follow and like us:
0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *